Barbara Follárd: Maga Malade

4 July – 20 July 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

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Installation view, Kisterem, 2007

About the Art of Barbara Follárd

Barbara Follárd graduated in 2000 from the Hungarian University of Fine Arts (MKE). She received the scholarship of Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris between 2002 and 2003, and also in 2007. She received the Derkovits scholarship in 2007. Since 1997 she has taken part in numerous Hungarian and international group exhibitions in Paris, Luxembourg and Montescgalioso. In Budapest she has exhibited, amongst others, at Műcsarnok (Museum of Contemporary Art), Trafó, Stúdió Galéria, and Goethe Institute. Her second independent exhibition is being hosted by Kisterem.

In her exhibited videos, Barbara Follárd binds together such basic themes as identity from the perspective of sexuality, and theatricality, or being more exact, “mannerism”, behind which the velvet curtain lifts right away, revealing the mechanism of the creator’s narrative, which is one of the most important orientation points in the works. By disclosing the motives of the uniquely choreographed puppet stories – the fishing-lines and rulers –, she eliminates the visual twists of the video animation’s expectation horizon. This kind of storytelling could be compared mostly, with a little exaggeration, to a skirt going up, and this would not miss much the atmosphere of the mini-scenes, which, stripped down sometimes to haute-couture, and sometimes to tinkered-box spaces, where the little elephant sniffs cocaine in his purple negligee (Hector in Purple), or the rabbit and the frog paddle about the maze of their “nexus net”, their ambiguity and the little chicks (Tokyo Tonight).

Of course the dynamics of opening up never bog down on the reef of the pleasant syrup taste, and it plays an important role in the scenes taking place on the sea of the pinch of hysteria, and self irony. Just as in the case of für Imaginary semi-invalid, where the spectator looses foothold, while trying to follow the way Moliere’s The Imaginary Invalid is taken apart to small fibers. Along with the marionette puppets and strings getting into a muddle in the ballet comedy, Argan pampers himself with his unending snivels, his forced enemas, and also with the spectacle of the pink-haired maid, escaped from the German dance floor chart.

The many knots and ties of the story still do not stick in the viewer’s throat, as the storyteller-navigator glides further, on her sailboat, across the mirror-surfaced water of the “little basin” (Self-Pool). This way, in her swimming hat, she puts herself in such a mini-environment, where is no place for any other performer anymore, and it is the self-disclosing dance and talk, that turns the short circuited communicational system self-supporting.

Áron Fenyvesi